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Procedures

COLONOSCOPY

Colonoscopy is a procedure to examine the inner surfaces of the large bowel (which includes the rectum and the colon) and in most cases the last part of the small bowel (the terminal ileum). This is done using a specially-designed flexible tube that contains a camera and light that transmits images to a large computer screen. A number of additional procedures can be carried out during a colonoscopy including: sampling small pieces of tissue, called biopsies, from the bowel wall to assist in making a diagnosis; removal of polyps from the bowel wall, dilatation of areas of narrowing within the examined bowel, stopping specific types of bowel wall bleeding.

 

ENDOSCOPY

An upper GI endoscopy is a procedure to examine the inner surfaces of the oesophagus (gullet or food pipe), stomach and duodenum (the first part of your small bowel). This is done using a specially-designed flexible tube that contains a camera and light that transmits images to a large computer screen (an endoscope). A number of additional procedures can be carried out during an upper GI endoscopy including: sampling small pieces of tissue, called biopsies, from the gut wall to assist in making a diagnosis; removal of polyps from the gut wall, dilatation of areas of narrowing within the examined gut segments, and/or stopping specific types of gut wall bleeding.

This procedure is normally undertaken to further investigate symptoms such as tummy pain, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and/or difficulty swallowing. It may also be undertaken if you have abnormal blood tests such as iron deficiency, other disorders such as Crohn’s disease, or abnormal scans (CT, ultrasound, MR scan) of this part of the gut.

A barium meal is an alternative investigation to upper GI endoscopy and may sometimes be organized prior to the endoscopy. However, studies have shown that endoscopy carries better diagnostic accuracy for a range of disorders and allows the specialist to take biopsies to diagnose or exclude disorders.

 

ENTEROSCOPY

An enteroscopy is where the doctor uses an instrument called an endoscope to look at the oesophagus (food pipe), stomach and the small bowel. This is common if bleeding, inflammation, ulceration or other abnormalities of the small bowel are suspected.

An endoscope is a long, thin, flexible tube with a small camera and light attached which allows the doctor to see the pictures of the inside of your gut on a video screen. The scope bends, so that the doctor can move it around the curves of your gut. The scope also blows carbon dioxide (CO2) and this expands the folds of tissues so that the doctor can see the linings better. You may feel some pressure or bloating following the procedure which should resolve rapidly.

This instrument can also be used to remove small growths (polyps), to take tissue biopsies or aspirate fluid samples.

 

FLEXIBLE SIGMOIDOSCOPY

A sigmoidoscopy is where the doctor looks at the inside lining of your lower large bowel to see if there are any growths or disease. This is done by putting an instrument called a sigmoidoscope into your back passage (anus). A sigmoidoscope is a short flexible tube with a bright light and tiny camera attached. Pictures of the inside of your bowel can be seen on a video screen. This procedure may or may not require a sedation anaesthetic.

 

PROCEDURAL LOCATIONS

North West Private Hospital

137 Flockton Street,
EVERTON PARK  Q  4053

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Westside Private Hospital

Level 1 – 32 Morrow Street,
TARINGA  Q 4068

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